The Dangers of Asking The Lord.

I’ve been really blessed the past few weeks by this hymn.

Written by John Newton, it speaks of the danger of asking for holiness, growing in the Lord. On the flipside, it proclaims the comfort and security in amidst the turmoil and despair. It’s quite lovely.

I asked the Lord that I might grow
In faith, and love, and every grace;
Might more of His salvation know,
And seek, more earnestly, His face.

‘Twas He who taught me thus to pray,
And He, I trust, has answered prayer!
But it has been in such a way,
As almost drove me to despair.

I hoped that in some favored hour,
At once He’d answer my request;
And by His love’s constraining pow’r,
Subdue my sins, and give me rest.

Instead of this, He made me feel
The hidden evils of my heart;
And let the angry pow’rs of hell
Assault my soul in every part.

Yea more, with His own hand He seemed
Intent to aggravate my woe;
Crossed all the fair designs I schemed,
Blasted my gourds, and laid me low.

Lord, why is this, I trembling cried,
Wilt thou pursue thy worm to death?
“‘Tis in this way, the Lord replied,
I answer prayer for grace and faith.

These inward trials I employ,
From self, and pride, to set thee free;
And break thy schemes of earthly joy,
That thou may’st find thy all in Me.”

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Are Christians Blogging A Contradiction?

The goal of a professional blogger is quite simply to be popular on the internet.

 

More often than not, blogs are the means of which to get the end of making money through getting enough advertising revenue or directing people towards a book they’ve written. A trend I often see is to get popular through getting enough traffic onto your site by writing on popular topics and relating to the audience that they are directed towards. Abortion and homosexuality are both hot button topics which people are attracted like fruit flies to. Sarah Palin has built her whole political soapbox on these two principles, which are admittedly small in the larger scheme of things like running an economy.

Yet, the goal of a Christian “is to glorify God, and fully to enjoy him forever” as the Westminster Confession states. 1 Corinthians 10:31 says it all that “whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.” The Christian life is totally God-focused, and dependent on the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit within our lives. The difference is the focus is turned onto God, and the Holy Spirit as he works in us.

I understand there is a difference between amateur and professional blogging, but where exactly does the line get crossed? A professional has a success measured by popularity and views, but an amateur is only a voice that wants to be heard. The aspirations are the dividing factor, and I’ll let God judge the thoughts and attitudes of our hearts.

Too often we are easily entrapped by the attraction of money and fame on the internet, especially here on revelife and xanga, with the number of views openly counted. There is constantly a temptation to me to write on controversial topics because they garner more views, but God calls me back constantly to this place of writing what he wants me to write. It is so easy to march under the flag of God, but to be faithful to the cause is much more difficult. Similarly, it is easy to write about Christian topics, but to fully submit to God and let him write the words is much more difficult in my experience. The lyrics to the chorus of the song “Write The Words” from FFH describe exactly my thoughts:

“I don’t know what to say
That hasn’t already been said
I don’t know what to write
That hasn’t already been read
I don’t know what to play
That You haven’t already heard
So here’s my song, You write the words
Here’s my heart, You write the words”

The thought of having to write 6 posts a week consistently is difficult for me. There is so much that I don’t know, and so much that I think that should not be written down in a blog. I feel especially convicted when I think of the amount of time I spent writing blogs in proportion to how much time I spend praying that my words might be powerful. There is a self-centeredness rooted in the way that I blog, that I seek to change.

In many ways, it is a far cry from being led by God to write because some nights where I can churn out 3 posts without an issue. Other times I can just sit around and surf the web for hours with nothing jumping out, but I don’t actually waste my time doing that now that I’m back at school. Continually, I find myself where I have to come back and remember why I’m here blogging, and it is to glorify God and in everything I do.

Therefore, how can we reconcile, the God-centered life of a Christian with the money-centered demands as we traverse deeper and deeper into blogosphere? Exactly how compatible is it to attract people to a site compared to a Christian, who seeks God in all that he does? Is Christian blogging a oxymoron?